LONDONERS WILLING TO PAY £15 DAILY CONGESTION CHARGE TO IMPROVE TRANSPORT AND AIR QUALITY

PLMR

With the 2016 London Mayoral election fast approaching and Boris Johnson warning that the next Mayor will have to raise or alter the congestion charge to combat growing traffic gridlock, a change looks to be on the horizon for the £11.50 fee.

Polling released today by YouGov and communications firm PLMR shows that 42 per cent of Londoners would be in support of increasing the congestion charge from £11.50 to £15.00 a day if the money is spent on walking and cycle schemes, public transport and improving air quality. This is compared to only 30 per cent of Londoners who oppose the fee increase.

Interestingly, Conservative voters were more in favour of the fee increase than Labour voters, with 48 per cent of those who voted Conservative in 2015 supportive, compared to 45 per cent amongst Labour voters. However, Conservatives are also the most polarised political party with 32 per cent opposed to the change. UKIP voters were found to be the most opposed to an increase whilst Green voters perhaps unsurprisingly, were the most supportive.

Male Londoners were also found to be more strongly in favour of increasing the congestion charge than women – with support ratings of 46 per cent and 39 per cent respectively.

With the introduction of the Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) scheduled for September 2020, the results show that many Londoners would support action taken by sooner, rather than later.

Kevin Craig, Managing Director of PLMR, said:

“With traffic delays worsening, London’s population increasing and road space under growing pressure, Mayoral candidates need to show how they would reduce the gridlock and clean up London’s air. London’s air quality situation is critical – I feel it every day on my bike journey to work.”

“Whilst both Sadiq Khan and Zac Goldsmith have refused to commit to an increase in the congestion charge, our polling shows Londoners are willing to pay more to ease traffic in the capital and invest in walking and cycle schemes, public transport and London’s air quality.”

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